The several debates of the House of Commons in the reign of the late King James II
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The several debates of the House of Commons in the reign of the late King James II pro & contra, relating to the establishment of the militia, disbanding the new raised forces, and raising a present supply for His Majesty, beginning the ninth of November, 1685, and ending the twentieth day of the same month, being the day of the prorogation of the Parliament.

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Published by [s.n.] in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Great Britain -- History -- James II, 1685-1688.,
  • Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1660-1688.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 1383:4.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination28 p.
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16781432M

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Mr Grey, the Compiler of these Debates, not being a Member of King James's Parliament, it has been thought proper in some measure to supply the defect, by the following Abstract of the Proceedings of Parliament, in that short and unfortunate Reign, taken from the Journals of the House. The several debates of the House of Commons in the reign of the late King James II pro & contra, relating to the establishment of the militia, disbanding the new raised forces, and raising a present supply for His Majesty, beginning the ninth of November, , and ending the twentieth day of the same month, being the day of the prorogation of the : England and Wales. Parliament. Main Article Primary Sources (1) Daniel Defoe, A Tour Through the Whole Island of Great Britain () Parliament meets in the King's old palace. St. Stephen's Chapel, formerly the royal chapel of the palace, but lately beautified for the convenience of the House of Commons, was a . James II's Parliament of May , predominantly Tory, was initially obedient and generous. But when it resisted his wishes to exempt Catholics from the restrictions of the Test Act, James adjourned it in November. He then continuously prorogued it for more than a .

Burnet,, History of His Own Time, 4: ; Turberville,, The House of Lords in the Reign of William III, p. But when the bill was returned to the Commons, after a late debate in a very full House, it carried to See also B.L., Add., MSS. 30, A f. 8. When the last Tudor monarch, Elizabeth I, died in , King James VI of Scotland came to power as King James I, founding the Stuart monarchy. In , alarmed by the arbitrary exercise of royal power, the House of Commons submitted to Charles I the Petition of Right, demanding the restoration of their liberties. Though he accepted the petition. , Parliament sought to prevent Catholicism from returning to England, so decided to get rid of James II. They offered the monarchy to William of Orange and his wife Mary (daughter of James II). This revolution got rid of James II, and made sure that the monarch was under Parliament thereafter. Charles II died, james II became king. The revolution. The reign of Charles II because he restored the monarchy. Habeas corpus "To have the body" a prisoner- has the right to a judge to specify the charges against a prisoner. That way a ruler could not put an innocent person in jail House of Commons created in

The third and penultimate Parliament of James' reign was summoned in The House of Commons agreed to grant James a small subsidy to signify their loyalty, but then, to the displeasure of the King, moved on to personal matters directly involving the King. The practice of selling monopolies and other privileges was also deprecated. Whereas the late King James the Second, by the assistance of divers evil counsellors, judges and ministers employed by him, did endeavour to subvert and extirpate the Protestant religion and the. The Stuart period began in with the death of Queen Elizabeth I and the accession of King James I. There was a break in the middle but the Stuarts were restored to the throne in It ended in (after years) with the death of Queen Anne and the accession of King George I, the first king of the House of Hanover. The yellow bars. a declaration by the House of Commons of England reaffirming their right to freedom of speech in the face of King James' belief that they had no right to debate foreign policy. Many Members of Parliament were unhappy with James' foreign policy. They opposed the plan to marry Charles to Henrietta Maria, and wished for a war against Spain.